Who's Your Caddy? review by Tom Blain

See this movie compete in Jackass Critics Tournament of Sports Movies

Is it politically incorrect for me to refer to Whos your Caddy? as Caddyblack? Now that its printed I guess its too late. Back in the 70s, this name would have not only been the norm but it would have been tame. Why does this movie remind me of 70s blaxploitation? Is it because the African American actors in the the movie along with all the African American audience members are exploited via cheap acting labor and high ticket prices so that white producers and studio owners can make a mint off their market? No. Its because like a lot, but not all, of movies from that period its downright bad.

C-Note (Big Boi from Outkast) is a big money rapper who is trying to join an exclusive country club. He comes in with his entourage and gets turned away by Club President Cummings (Jeffrey Jones who has fallen so far) immediately. C-Note is well-mannered enough, its just that he doesnt fit the tite-wad, clean, cut, button-down white-guy model that all other members fit into. C-Notes assistant finds a loophole in a housing contract that gives them partial ownership of the 17th green. In order to get the land back, Cummings gives him a probationary membership, that he schemes to rip away as soon as there is a single infraction of bylaws. When the threat of revoke that membership comes about, Reverend JJJ Jackson comes out of the woodworks threatening to sue the crap out of the country club. So C-Note is in and reveals his true agenda. But Cummings still wants him out.

There are a number of moments that are intended to be funny: Blacks vs. Whites polo event, Cummings son hanging out with the rappers and adopting their lifestyle, a golf outing that includes a golf cart rigged to look like a hummer, and Jeffrey Jones walking around in a strip club looking for midget hit men. But frankly the description of these scenes is actually a notch funnier than the actual execution. What went wrong?

First, there are no real comedic actors in the lead roles. Big Boi plays the lead role straight, with little flair and personality. His character is this golden boy rapper who probably has a cleaner past than some of the white dudes who already have memberships. There really is nothing funny about him, and even if there was supposed to be, he plays it so straight that we cant laugh at him. The other actors around him have a bit more energy, but its used in all the wrong places. They spend as much time laughing within the movie as they do talking. Rule #1: Dont laugh too much at your own jokes especially if the jokes arent funny. Its disingenuous.

Second, the theme for the movie is a retread of other bad movies with nothing extra to add, or no corrections made to the bad movies they are modeled after. Caddyshack II (not the first one) is probably the closet comparison. In Caddyshack II a Jewish builder is the guy trying to get into the stuffy country club and ends up buying the place out and turning it into an amusement park golf course. It was an epic failure and disappointment considering the actors that were involved, and especially considering that the first Caddyshack is a highly revered comedy classic. So replace the Jewish builder with the black rapper, subtract comedic actors who might pull at least one two laughs each out of an ill-conceived project, add some non-actors just having a good time in front of the camera, insert sections from three various rap videos as filler and you have Whos Your Caddy.

It should be noted that it took me multiple attempts spanned out over a month plus to get through Whos your Caddy?. Actually as I write this review, Ive tried three times to watch the whole thing and still have about 20 minutes unfinished its that low on my priority list. If it was any good I probably would have finished it in one sitting but like drinking cheap boos, its not really advised to be consumed but if thats your goal it should not be done in one sitting. Bad movie. Justbad.




1 out of 10 Jackasses
blog comments powered by Disqus